The D2G2 Group, led by Professor Mark Kendall, has a number of positive media stories for needle-free vaccination delivery systems.

Needle-free vaccination company wins accolade

 Vaxxas has won the 2012 Janssen AusBiotech Emerging Company of the Year Award - 2 November 2012

AIBN biomedical engineer an alumni leader

Prof Kendall was named The Young Alumnus of the Year at UQ’s annual alumni awards ceremony in Brisbane on Tuesday night. The awards recognise UQ alumni who have achieved outstanding success in their fields and made exemplary contributions to their communities - 26 October 2012

Merck partnership accelerates needle-free vaccine delivery

An Australian Institute for Bioengineering and Nanotechnology (AIBN) invention that will deliver vaccines without the need for needles is at the centre of a significant partnership with US-based pharmaceutical giant Merck, announced today - 9 October 2012.

2012 GlaxoSmithKline Awards for Research Excellence

Professor Mark Kendall has been named a finalist in one of Australia's longest running and most prestigious medical research awards: the GlaxoSmithKline Awards for Research Excellence - 23 August 2012

2012 Rolex reward for Nanopatch researcher’s pioneering efforts

Professor Mark Kendall is one of only five recipients of a prestigious Rolex Laureate, recognising pioneering efforts to expand knowledge and improve human life - 14 June 2012

Vaccine delivery investment wins global award

A $15 million investment in a start-up company to advance research and development at the Australian Institute for Bioengineering and Nanotechnology (AIBN) has won the 2012 Best Venture Capital Investment prize. 

Nanopatch vaccine technology developer Vaxxas and its investors received the prestigious prize at the Vaccine Industry Excellence Awards at the World Vaccine Congress in Washington DC in the US. 
The investment in Vaxxas enables AIBN Professor Mark Kendall and his research group to advance the Nanopatch, a needle-free vaccine delivery device, towards clinical testing and product development - 11 April 2012

Australian Innovation Prize

Professor Mark Kendall’s research on the Nanopatch has been rewarded with an overall win in The AustralianInnovation Challenge - 7 December 2011.

Professor Mark Kendall at the awards
ceremony.
 

Eureka Prize for Nanopatch research team

6 September 2011

Australian Institute for Bioengineering and Nanotechnology Professor Mark Kendall was awarded the

Prof Mark Kendall receives the Eureka prize from Australian Research Council CEO Margaret Sheil

Eureka Prize for Research by an Interdisciplinary Team.

Professor Kendall and his AIBN team have worked with engineers, mathematicians, material scientists and immunologists from three other institutes on the needle-free vaccine delivery device, the Nanopatch.

The research has involved input from laboratories of cervical cancer vaccine inventor Professor Ian Frazer,

the Translational Research Institute at Brisbane's Princess Alexandra Hospital; Professor Michael Roberts, Director of the Therapeutics Research Unit at Queensland University's School of Medicine; and the University of Melbourne's Professor Lorena Brown from the Department of Immunology and Microbiology.

Eureka Website Link.
 

Web Child - The online community for parents

Needle-less vaccines a step closer

4 August 2011 | Liz Ginis

If a needle in the arm makes your child’s blood run cold, take heart. The nanopatch is coming.

The needle-free vaccine delivery system is a step closer to reality after a consortium of investors put up $15 million for its development.

The money will allow Professor Mark Kendall, of the University of Queensland, to continue his work on the postage-stamp sized patch that allows a small dose of vaccine to be administered more effectively than via traditional needles.

Syringe

 

News On ABC

Scientists get funding injection for needle-free vaccines research

3 August 2011

Herald Sun

Patch at pointy end of vaccine

3 August 2011 | Janelle Miles

IF the sight of a needle-wielding doctor heading your way freaks you out, take heart. The nanopatch is coming.

The needle-free vaccine delivery system is a step closer to reality after a consortium of investors put up $15 million for its development.

http://destinationsmedia.newspaperdirect.com/epaper/viewer.aspx

 

One Ventures

New vaccine delivery company kick start with $15M venture capital investment

2 August 2011

BRISBANE, QLD, AUSTRALIA - One of Australia’s largest ever investments in a start-up biotechnology company - AU$15million – has been made with the aim of developing a revolutionary new needle-free vaccine delivery system.

The investment led by OneVentures, with co-investors Brandon Capital, the Medical Research Commercialisation Fund (MRCF), and US-based HealthCare Ventures in the new company, Vaxxas Pty Ltd, will enable Professor Mark Kendall of UQ’s Australian Institute for Bioengineering and Nanotechnology (AIBN) to continue his pioneering research and development of the Nanopatch™.

The Nanopatch™ has thousands of small projections designed to deliver the vaccine to abundant immune cells in the skin, whereas the traditional syringe hits the muscle where there are few immune cells.  See media release 2 August 2011

 

2010 Translational Research Excellence Commercialisation Award

Step Closer to Putting Needle-Free Vaccine Delivery on World Stage

Nanopatches(Awarded by MERCK in conjunction with OCTN).

AIBN researchers believe they are a step closer to ridding the world of vaccinations with needles and syringes.

Professor Mark Kendall's research team won a major award for their work on needle-free vaccination delivery device Nanopatch.

Winning the 2010 Translational Research Excellence Commercialisation Award will give Prof Kendall a chance to meet senior executives from global pharmaceutical company Merck Sharp and Dohme in the US.The company will also pay up to $10,000 for Prof Kendall to attend international convention Bio 2011 in Washington DC in June.

Prof Kendall said winning the award was a "great shot in the arm" for his research team, providing both a pat on the back and a chance to move the technology forward."This is important, as it is a step towards partnering our Nanopatch with one of the world's leading vaccine companies," he said. "Our ambition is for Nanopatch to be taken from the current stage of animal model success through the clinic - and on to the market as a next-generation vaccine delivery device, potentially displacing the needle and syringe."This progression requires commercialisation and partnership with the right players. This award is an important step along this pathway."

Nanopatch has been shown in trials to provide a protective immunisation in mice, with less than a hundredth of the dosage used compared to needle and syringe. A part of the appeal of the Nanopatch is that it is painless, needle-free and is a potential solution for those with a needle phobia.Because the vaccine is formulated in dry form, it is also thermostable, removing the need for refrigeration. Nanopatch is smaller than a postage stamp and is dissolvable, eliminating the possibility of needle-stick injury.

"When compared to needle and syringe immunisations - with all the associated costs - the Nanopatch is cheap to produce," Professor Kendall said. "And it is easy to imagine a situation in which a Government might provide vaccinations for a pandemic such as swine flu to be collected from a chemist or sent in the mail."

Prof Kendall said the work had been in progress for five years and his team hoped to start clinical trials soon.

Science Alert

Nanopatch replaces needles

Nano Magazine

The new Nanopatch vaccine administration technique says goodbye to needles.

December 2010

Scientists from The University of Queensland have pioneered a new needle-free vaccination technique using a little help from nanotechnology. The Nanopatch vaccine delivery mechanism is the brainchild of Professor Mark Kendall and his team of researchers at the University's Australian Institute for Bioengineering and Nanotechnology, and could pave the way to a new, cheaper, less invasive form of vaccination. Not only this, but the Nanopatch even outperforms vaccinations provided by its prickly friend, the syringe.

http://www.nanomagazine.co.uk/index.php?option=com_content&view=category&layout=blog&id=92&Itemid=147

Courier Mail, Qweekend

The AAA List

20 November 2010

Mark KendallHigh Achievers who justify the Smart State tag. Mark Kendall, Biomedical Engineer, featured 4th on the list.

No more vaccinations needles? We could see that within a decade, thanks to the Nanopatch developed by Kendall and his world-leading research team at the Australian Institute for Bioengineering and Nanotechnology, UQ. Their tiny patch is packed with microscopic "projections" that can painlessly deliver a vaccine into the body's thousands of immune cells when placed on the skin for two minutes. It's been successfullly trialled in mice to administer vaccines for influenza, West Nile and Chukunga viruses, and - in collaboration with Professor Ian Frazer - the Gardasil cervical cancer vaccine. Significantly, the Nanopatch produced the required immune response with only 150th  of the flu vaccine dose that is standard with a needle. This, coupled with the fact it doesn't need to be refrigerated, means vaccines could in the future be cheaper, as well as easier to administer.

Year Ahead: Planning for human clinical trials.

Medical News Today

Needle-Free Vaccine Technology A Step Closer To Clinical Trials, Australia

27 October 2010

Researchers at The University of Queensland believe they are a step closer to ridding the world of vaccinations with needles and syringes.

Professor Mark Kendall's team from the Australian Institute for Bioengineering and Nanotechnology (AIBN) has won a major award for their work on the needle-free vaccination delivery device Nanopatch.

As a consequence of winning the 2010 Translational Research Excellence Commercialisation Award, Professor Kendall will meet senior executives from global pharmaceutical company Merck Sharp and Dohme in the US.

http://www.medicalnewstoday.com/articles/205875.php

Nanowerk News, Institute of Nanotechnology

Needle-free nanopatch vaccine technology a step closer to clinical trials

26 October 2010

Professor Mark Kendall's team from the Australian Institute for Bioengineering and Nanotechnology (AIBN) has now won a major award for their work on the needle-free vaccination delivery device Nanopatch.

As a consequence of winning the 2010 Translational Research Excellence Commercialisation Award, Professor Kendall

Professor Kendall holding Nanopatch
Prof Kendall with the Nanopatch

will meet senior executives from global pharmaceutical company Merck Sharp and Dohme in the US.  The company will also pay up to $10,000 for Professor Kendall to attend the Bio 2011 convention in Washington DC. Just as refinements in laser scanning technology have had widespread applications, no less influential 

Professor Kendall said winning the award was a "great shot in the arm" for his research team, providing both a pat on the back and a chance to move the technology forward.

"This is important, as it is a step towards partnering our Nanopatch with one of the world's leading vaccine companies," he said.

“Our ambition is for Nanopatch to be taken from the current stage of animal model success through the clinical trials, and on to the market as a next-generation vaccine delivery device, potentially displacing the needle and syringe.

http://www.nanowerk.com/news/newsid=18659.php

 

 

TOPNEWS (New Zealand)

Syringe may be replaced by nano-patch

26 July 2010

A dissolving vaccination which can be administered without a needle has been developed by Australian researchers, which can be delivered to households in cases of outbreak of any pandemic

Unlike other times, this time micro-projection has been used, made from dried vaccine.

Journal small, in its latest edition, holds the outline of this nano-patch.

According to Mark Kendall of Australian Institute of Biotechnology and nano techno logy of the University of Queensland, this new form of vaccine can be stored without refrigeration and the use of this vaccine is not associated with needle-stick injury.

According to WHO’s estimation thirty percent of vaccinations in the African continent is unsafe as they get contaminated caused due to the needle-stick injury, for which Health care spends twenty five dollars for treating injury of such a kind.

http://topnews.net.nz/content/26510-syringe-may-be-replaced-nano-patch

ScienceHub Australia

UQ researchers develop a dissolvable needle-free Nanopatch for vaccine delivery

24 July 2010

UQ research has found the Nanopatch – a needle-free, pain-free method of vaccine delivery – is now dissolvable, eliminating the possibility of needle-stick injury.

Project leader Professor Mark Kendall, from the Australian Institute for Bioengineering and Nanotechnology, said the finding confirmed that the Nanopatch was a potential safer, cheaper alternative to needle vaccines.

http://www.sciencehub.com.au/23-jul-10-uq-researchers-develop-a-dissolvable-needle-free-nanopatch-for-vaccine-delivery/

UQ News, Physorg.com

UQ researchers develop a dissolvable needle-free Nanopatch for vaccine delivery

23 July 2010

UQ research has found the Nanopatch – a needle-free, pain-free method of vaccine delivery – is now dissolvable, eliminating the possibility of needle-stick injury.

Project leader Professor Mark Kendall, from the Australian Institute for Bioengineering and Nanotechnology, said the finding confirmed that the Nanopatch was a potential safer, cheaper alternative to needle vaccines.

The study was published recently in scientific journal Small.

“What we have been able to show for the first time is that the Nanopatch is completely dissolvable,” Professor Kendall said.

“That means zero needles, zero sharps, zero opportunity for contamination and zero chance of needle-stick injury.

http://www.uq.edu.au/news/?article=21615

Channel 10

SCOPE Children's Science Program

3 July 2010 

Mark Kendall on SCOPE

Nanopatch

We find out more about a tiny, engineered skin patch from Professor Mark Kendall at the University of Queensland. He shows us his research into delivering vaccinations without pain, without needles, and about 100 times more efficiently!       
http://ten.com.au/scope-16239.htm

To find out more about this exciting technology click here

The Seattle Times | Health

New vaccine-delivery options point away from needles

16 May 2010 | By Lee Bowman

The injection. The jab. A little pinch. Even "this won't hurt a bit"shots tend to leave many people squeamish.

Studies have found that up to 10 percent of U.S. adults are so frightened of needles that they'll avoid getting any medical treatment that might require getting a shot.

But scientists and drug companies are moving rapidly ahead with several new technologies that aim to deliver vaccines and other therapies needle-free.

One of the favored approaches is the inhalable vaccine, which has been around as a weakened live vaccine against the flu — FluMist — for some time.

Researchers at the University of Colorado at Boulder have developed a prototype for a new generation of inhaled vaccines based in part on studies that were originally done to understand how people inhale tiny airborne droplets of air pollution.

Safety and then larger effectiveness trials of a weakened measles vaccine delivered through the inhalant powder are slated to start in India this summer. In animal tests, the inhaler has been as effective in delivering the vaccine as traditional injections, the researchers say.

Robert Sievers, a professor of chemistry and biochemistry who heads the development team, said the process works by mixing the measles virus with carbon dioxide that's in a "supercritical state — part gas, part liquid"that produces microscopic bubbles and droplets that are dried into an inhalable powder.

The dose is actually dispensed using a small plastic sack that has an opening like the mouth of a plastic water bottle. With a good squeeze and a deep breath from the sack, "a child could be effectively vaccinated," Sievers said.

Aside from use for vaccines against childhood diseases, the researchers suggest the technology might offer another way to attack multidrug-resistant tuberculosis and to deliver vaccines against cervical cancer and perhaps other cancers.

Beyond eliminating needles and the risks of infection associated with them, the new inhalant system also offers a dry vaccine that doesn't require refrigeration or other special handling. For measles, it can be made at a cost of about 26 cents per dose — about the same as for an injectable dose.

Another dry-powder system, developed by the Connecticut-based MannKind Corp., has proved effective at delivering an ultra-fast-acting dose of insulin through the lungs, rather than by injection, giving some diabetics a near-natural rush of the hormone similar to that experienced by non-diabetics immediately after a meal.

The company expects that the same sort of devices could be used to deliver a variety of vaccines.

Another Colorado enterprise, a company called Pharmajet, has developed another no-needle technology that actually uses spring-loaded pressure to inject vaccine through the skin. A small plastic cylinder full of vaccine does not look like a needle, although there's still a tiny sting from the serum going through the skin.

The U.S. Food and Drug Administration approved the system last year in time to be used to deliver seasonal-flu shots in Colorado and New Jersey last fall.

Several groups of researchers and companies are also working toward vaccine-patch delivery systems that would carry active ingredients through the skin using small particles.

One group, at the University of Michigan, has designed a protein than can carry vaccine through cell membranes into the interior of cells, particularly immune cells just under the skin. Tests on mice have achieved activation of the immune system equal to that brought about by conventional vaccines.

Scientists at Queensland University in Australia have been working on a "nanopatch"vaccine that utilizes tiny projections — to small to feel — that nonetheless penetrate the skin deeply enough to activate those same immune cells. They're still testing with mice, but say one advantage of the system is that it can achieve the same level of immunity as shots, using about 100 times less actual vaccine.

http://seattletimes.nwsource.com/html/health/2011845981_needles17.html

The Seattle Times

New vaccine-delivery options point away from needles

16 May 2010 | Lee Bowman

Scientists at Queensland University in Australia have been working on a "nanopatch"vaccine that utilizes tiny projections — to small to feel — that nonetheless penetrate the skin deeply enough to activate those same immune cells. They're still testing with mice, but say one advantage of the system is that it can achieve the same level of immunity as shots, using about 100 times less actual vaccine.

http://seattletimes.nwsource.com/html/health/2011845981_needles17.html

Better Health

Nanopatches: The Future Of Vaccine Delivery?

13 May 2010 

Professor Mark Kendall of the Australian Institute for Bioengineering and Nanotechnology and his team have been investigating a novel way to deliver vaccines.

Their method makes use of nanopatches, which are fingernail-sized dermal patches with microscopic projections on their surface that hand vaccine off directly to the antigen-presenting cells just below the surface of the skin.

The scientists’ recent work in mice has shown that an immune response equivalent to that achievable by needle and syringe can be reached using 100 times less vaccine. Not only does the nanopatch appear to be a more effective delivery method, it’s also cheaper to produce and doesn’t require refrigeration, adjuvants or multiple doses.

http://getbetterhealth.com/nanopatches-the-future-of-vaccine-delivery/2010.05.13

The Pump Handle 

Nano Vaccination? 

13 May 2010 by Liz Borkowski

We keep writing about the risks involved with nanotechnology, so it’s nice to be able to highlight a potential benefit. Andrew Schneider reports for AOL News that researchers from the Australian Institute for Bioengineering and Nanotechnology have developed a “nanopatch” that can deliver vaccines more effectively than intramuscular injection:

[University of Queensland Professor Mark] Kendall told the Australian Broadcasting Corp. that the nanopatch is designed to place vaccines directly into the skin, where a “rich body of immune cells are.” A needle, by contrast, injects vaccines into muscles with few immune cells. As a result, the vaccines delivered by nanopatch are more effective, he said.

Cheap, simple, and effective vaccine administration has the potential to dramatically increase immunization rates in underresourced areas. Currently, many agencies struggle to fund struggle to fund vaccination programs that rely on refrigerated vaccines administered by trained professionals. Kendall also points out that easier transportation and administration of nanopatches can speed vaccination when the next pandemic develops. (The kind of fast response he envisions would also require us to overhaul our current vaccine-production system, but that’s a topic for another day.)

Such worthwhile applications of nanotechnology reminds us why we need to get this right — study the risks of nanotechnology, and put appropriate safeguards in place before nanoparticles are omnipresent. If several years from now nanoparticles have become the next asbestos, the chances of successfully promoting this kind of promising application will shrink.

http://thepumphandle.wordpress.com/2010/05/13/nano-vaccination/

 

TOPNEWS (U.S.)

Nanopatch Paves Way for New Way of Vaccine Delivery

26 April 2010

Professor Mark Kendall of the Australian Institute for Bioengineering and Nanotechnology and his team are examining a new way to vaccinate.

They have devised a new method that makes use of nanopatches to deliver vaccines. Nanopatches are fingernail-sized dermal patches. These sport microscopic projections on their surface. These projections transfer the vaccine directly to the antigen-presenting cells, which are present just beneath the dermis.

The scientists conducted the examination on mice. The study showed that the patches elicit an immune response, which is equivalent to that produced by a needle and syringe, but by using a 100 times lesser dose of the vaccine.

The study reveals that the nanopatch is not only an efficient method of delivering the vaccine, it is also cheaper, does not require refrigeration, adjuvants or multiple doses.

Kendall delineates the nanopatch as even smaller than postage stamp and consisting of many thousand closely packed projections which are not visible through the naked eye.

Kendall said, "By using far less vaccine we believe that the nanopatch will enable the vaccination of many more people".

It is also comparatively cheap to produce.     

http://topnews.us/content/218133-nanopatch-paves-way-new-way-vaccine-delivery

 

Channel 7 News

Nanopatch technology: End to needles  

26 April 2010

ABC News

Nanopatch tipped to replace needle

24 April 2010

Queensland researchers are trialling a painless nanopatch that uses 100 times less vaccine than a needle and syringe.  

Channel 9 News

Nanopatch tipped to replace syringe

24 April 2010

Researchers have used nanotechnology to discover a far more effective and less painful vaccination technique than the syringe.

University of Queensland Professor Mark Kendall's bio engineering and nanotechnology team have developed the Nanopatch - which uses 100 times less vaccine than a syringe and is smaller than a postal stamp. 

http://news.ninemsn.com.au/article.aspx?id=1044275  

 

The Sydney Morning Herald

Nanopatch tipped to replace syringe

24 April 2010 | David Barker

Researchers have used nanotechnology to discover a far more effective and less painful vaccination technique than the syringe.

University of Queensland Professor Mark Kendall's bio engineering and nanotechnology team have developed the Nanopatch - which uses 100 times less vaccine than a syringe and is smaller than a postal stamp.

The patch is tipped to revolutionise vaccination programs in both industrialised and developing nations, which must overcome issues with vaccine shortages and distribution.

Advertisement: Story continues below Prof Kendall said being both painless and needle-free, the Nanopatch offers hope for those with needle-phobia, as well as improving the vaccination experience for young children.

"The Nanopatch targeted specific antigen-presenting cells found in a narrow layer just beneath the skin surface and as a result we used less than one-hundredth of the dose used by a needle while stimulating a comparable immune response," Prof Kendall said. "Our result is 10 times better than the best results achieved by other delivery methods and does not require the use of other immune stimulants, called adjuvants, or multiple vaccinations."

http://news.smh.com.au/breaking-news-national/nanopatch-tipped-to-replace-syringe-20100424-tjsl.html

 

AOL News

This Won't Hurt a Bit: Tiny Patch Could Replace Shots

23 April 2010

Good news for the needle-phobic: A vaccine delivered by a nanopatch works as well as one delivered with a syringe, but is pain-free and uses 100 times less medication, according to researchers from the Australian Institute for Bioengineering and Nanotechnology. 

Aside from sparing patients who are squeamish about being pricked, this new application of nanotechnology could have significant public health benefits.

http://www.aolnews.com/2010/04/23/this-won-t-hurt-a-bit-tiny-patch-could-replace-shots/

 

Radio

ABC News: The World Today

Nanopatch breakthrough could help rich and poor

22 April 2010

Scientists are hailing a development that could help poor countries vaccinate communities and help all countries fight pandemics. Researchers working on administering vaccines through Nanopatches on the skin rather than needles have found the patches require 100 times less of the drug.

http://www.abc.net.au/worldtoday/content/2010/s2880054.htm

 

ABC News

Researchers develop more efficient vaccine patch

22 April 2010

Injection
10 per cent of the population have needle phobia: Professor Kendle

The University of Queensland (UQ) has made an important discovery to give vaccines more efficiently without using needles.

Professor Mark Kendle, from UQs Institute of Bioengineering and Nanotechnology, developed a 'nanopatch' that takes two minutes to administer.

Professor Kendle says he has now found the nanopatch also uses 100 times less vaccine.

"We believe it has the potential to - if not replace - the needle and syringe - certainly displace it," he said.

 http://www.abc.net.au/news/stories/2010/04/22/2879499.htm

 

Less is more! Nanopatch is 100 times better than needle and syringe

22 April 2010

New research, led by Professor Mark Kendall, from UQ’s Australian Institute for Bioengineering and Nanotechnology, demonstrates that a vaccine delivered by a Nanopatch™ induces a similarly protective immune response as a vaccine delivered by needle and syringe, but uses 100 times less vaccine.

http://www.sciencehub.com.au/21-apr-10-less-is-more-nanopatch-is-100-times-better-than-needle-and-syringe/

 

A Schooner of Science

The needle free vaccine, how Nanopatch works

Nanopatch

22 April 2010

Researchers from Queensland University have discovered a new way to administer vaccines, a Nanopatch. Smaller than a postage stamp, the patch puts the vaccine through your skin. No need for an injection.

So how does it work?

The Nanopatch is full of micro-nanoprojections containing antigen – part of the bacteria or virus you are immunising against. These nanoprojections puncture the skin and deliver the antigen into your epidermis. The puncture is a breadth of a hair deep.

In your epidermis are Langerhans cells, members of the immune system. Their role is to pick up antigens from infecting nasties, or in this case the Nanopatch. Once they have collected something, they physically move from the skin to your lymph nodes. Lymph nodes are the hub of the immune system. Once there, the Langerhans cells mature and display the antigen to passing naïve T-cells.

http://www.aschoonerofscience.com/?p=1265

 

Pharmacy News

Self-administered vaccines on the way

22 April 2010 | by Simone Roberts

Pharmacists' fight to immunise may all be in vain with a new invention enabling patients to self-administer vaccines.

Researchers at the University of Queensland have today revealed the Nanopatch – a patch smaller than a postage stamp comprised of several thousands of densely packed projections that deliver a vaccine through the skin.

The patch eliminates the need for the needle and syringe and does not require a trained practitioner to administer it.

"In the future one real possibility could well be a situation of self-administration," lead researcher Professor Mark Kendall told Pharmacy eNews.

http://www.pharmacynews.com.au/article/self-administered-vaccines-on-the-way/515941.aspx

 

UQ News

“Less is more! Nanopatch is 100 times better than needle and syringe”

21 April 2010

New research led by Professor Mark Kendall from the Australian Institute for Bioengineering and Nanotechnology at UQ, demonstrates that a vaccine delivered by a Nanopatch induces a similarly protective immune response as a vaccine delivered by needle and syringe, but uses 100 times less vaccine.

http://www.uq.edu.au/news/index.html?article=21034

612 ABC Brisbane

Needles no match for the 'nanopatch'

19 April 2010

Mark chatting to Warren Boland

Mark Kendall chats to Warren Boland at UQ's Centenary celebrations.

No one looks forward to them and 10 per cent of the population harbours a genuine phobia, but eradicating needles completely would have seemed like the stuff of dreams - until the ground-breaking development of the 'nanopatch' at the University of Queensland. 
 

http://www.abc.net.au/local/stories/2010/04/19/2876297.htm

All Voices

Needles for Vaccination Could Be History

20 July 2009

Australian researchers are working to make these scary things obosolete when vaccination time rolls around. Relief could be at hand for people who are scared of hypodermic needles but need a flu shot. Australian researchers are developing a needle free method of vaccination using a device called the nanopatch. The nanopatch is a small pad like object similar to the nicotine patches some people use to try and quit smoking.

http://www.allvoices.com/contributed-news/3723517-needles-for-vaccination-could-be-history

Nanowerk

Swine flu vaccinations with nanopatch technology

14 July 2009

(Nanowerk News) In response to the growing threat of swine flu, a University of Queensland (UQ) team is applying nanopatch technology to potentially solve the problems associated with vaccinating millions of Australians, thanks to a recently announced government grant.

Australian Institute for Bioengineering and Nanotechnology (AIBN) researcher Professor Mark Kendall heads a team testing the potency of mass vaccinations using only a fraction of the standard dose. 

The project also targets cross–protection by delivering the seasonal vaccine to protect against challenge from the swine A H1N1 influenza virus.

Professor Kendall said this research used new nanopatch technology which does away with the needle and syringe and stimulated a potent immune response with a reduced dose.  “By accurately and reliably delivering the vaccine to the abundant immune cells, which are located just under of the surface of the skin, we are able to initiate a rapid and powerful immune response from the body, while using considerably less vaccine,” Professor Kendall said.  “The beauty of the nanopatch is that it could enable large-scale rapid vaccinations in a cost effective manner that is currently not available with the needle and syringe.

http://www.nanowerk.com/news/newsid=11624.php

2009 Australian Leadership Award Winner

Future Summit, Australian Davos Connection. The recipients of the Australian Leadership Awards were selected for their leadership ability and commitment to shaping the future of Australia. The Australian Leadership Awards provide the opportunity for outstanding new generation leaders to be recognised for their achievements and to contribute to a vision for Australia’s future. The awards program provides the opportunity for awardees to build active relationships wtih both their peers and senior leaders associated with the Summit and a range of alumni events. 

Mail Online (UK)

The jab-free vaccine you can get in the post

23 June 2008

 

post

The vaccine comes in the form of a skin patch that can be sent in the post 

Need a vaccination but hate needles, or just can't get an appointment at your local GP? Scientists believe they have found the solution: a 'needle-free' vaccine that could be sent to you through the post.

The vaccine comes in the form of a skin patch and, unlike conventional vaccinations, can be self-administered.

The patch, which has been developed by scientists at the University of Queensland, has recently been tested on animals and results soon to be published show it is even more effective than traditional needle vaccination, despite requiring far less vaccine.

The scientists behind the innovation claim it could even be mailed to individuals in the event of a health pandemic.

The patch is the size of a 5p piece, but needs to be applied to the skin for only a few minutes to be effective. This is because it contains thousands of tiny projections - coated in the vaccine - on its underside.

These projections push through the outer layer of skin to the thin layer beneath, which is rich in cells crucial to the immune system.

http://www.dailymail.co.uk/health/article-1028880/The-jab-free-vaccine-post.html

 

ABC News

Gene gun, patches 'to replace vaccine needles'

4 June 2008

A University of Queensland professor says 'gene guns' and abrasive patches could soon replace needles as the preferred method of delivering vaccines.

http://www.abc.net.au/news/stories/2008/06/04/2264367.htm

Australia Medical Researcher Award

Professor Mark Kendall has been awarded the 2008 Amgen Medical Research Award for his excellence in translational medical research studies. 

This national award is made annually by the Australian Society for Medical Research as part of Medical Research Week - 3rd June 2008.
 

"Best Medical Innovation"

Medical Category, “Popular Science” Magazine, printed in the December 2005 Edition.

"Younger Engineer of Britain" Prize

At the Houses of Parliament, Westminster, selected from 130 Engineers nominated from the United Kingdom - 2004